Synthetic Taurine Not Your Cup Of Coffee

Most energy drinks contain Taurine. Why? Because Red Bull, maybe on a hunch, added Taurine to their drink 20 years ago and no one ever asked why. That’s why. It amazes me that over 7 billion cans of energy drinks are consumed every year (one for every human being!) despite the fact that they contain several highly questionable ingredients. Us humans definitely travel in herds!
The taurine found in energy drinks is synthetic and can cause medical problems, according to recent studies (see Heart Problems with Synthetic Taurine). The cocktail gets even worse when it is combined with caffeine, as it is often the case in smart drinks (see Taurine and Caffeine).
Because of these and other studies, taurine is banned in energy drinks in many European countries. Other contries are examining this issue very cafefully.
I drink energy drinks when I need to stay awake late and during long days of work. They’re great when I need to drive back home after a long day of work. They’re a great addition to my everyday diet.
The problem with most energy drinks is that, for marketing purposes, they include all kinds of other unnecessary and sometimes dangerous ingredients (artificial sweeteners, High Fructose, artificial vitamins). This increases the likelihood that at some time in the future, some health issues will develop. One could argue that many drugs currently being reviewed by the FDA also have potentially overwhelming side-effects. This is why the FDA reviews and rejects drugs where the negatives outweigh the postives. The FDA does not review energy drinks.
So, are they all bad? NO. Some have no Taurine, so that’s the starting point for me. Some natural energy drinks I’ve tried and like are Guyaki Yerba Matte), GURU Energy Drink), and Sambason Energy. None have the explosive mix of chemicals contained in the Hansens or Red Bull products. They mostly give you what you need: A natural stimulant plus a minimum of other natural ingredients, most of them organic.